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The Latest At Henry Mayo

We have not had an Ebola case at Henry Mayo. Nonetheless we have taken extra preparedness measures, such as conducting additional staff training, to ensure we are well prepared should an Ebola patient arrive at Henry Mayo.

 

Here is some basic information about the disease:

WHAT IS EBOLA

Ebola, previously known as Ebola hemorrhagic fever, is a rare disease with a high fatality rate caused by an infection with one of the Ebola virus strains. Ebola can cause disease in humans and nonhuman primates (monkeys, gorillas, and chimpanzees).

 

WHO IS AT RISK OF EXPOSURE TO EBOLA

Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with the blood or body fluids of sick patients. People also can become sick with Ebola after coming in contact with infected wildlife/bushmeat in Africa.

 

WHAT ARE THE SYMPTOMS OF EBOLA

Fever (greater than 38.6°C or 101.5°F), severe headache, muscle pain, weakness, diarrhea vomiting, abdominal (stomach) pain, unexplained hemorrhage (bleeding or bruising), symptoms may appear anywhere from 2 to 21 days after exposure to Ebola, but the average is 8 to 10 days.

 

HOW IS EBOLA TRANSMITTED

Ebola is spread through direct contact (through broken skin or mucous membranes) with blood or body fluids (including but not limited to urine, saliva, feces, vomit, and semen) of a person who is sick with Ebola and or objects (like needles and syringes) that have been contaminated with the virus infected animals. Ebola is not spread through the air or by water, or in general, food. However, in Africa, Ebola may be spread as a result of handling bushmeat (wild animals hunted for food) and contact with infected bats. Healthcare providers caring for Ebola patients and the family and friends in close contact with Ebola patients are at the highest risk of getting sick because they may come in contact with infected blood or body fluids of sick patients

 

HOW TO PREVENT TRAVEL EXP0SURE TO EBOLA

 

Minimize exposure to travel and persons who have traveled to areas of an outbreak with Ebola in West Africa Countries (Guinea, Liberia, Sierra Leone, and Senegal)

 

HOW TO PREVENT EXPOSURE TO EBOLA

Practice careful hygiene. Avoid contact with blood and body fluids.

Do not handle items that may have come in contact with an infected person’s blood or body fluids.

Avoid funeral or burial rituals that require handling the body of someone who has died from Ebola.

Avoid contact with bats and nonhuman primates or blood, fluids, and raw meat from these animals.

After you return from areas of Ebola outbreak in West Africa monitor your health for 21 days and seek medical care immediately if you develop symptoms of Ebola

 

 

 

TREATMENT

No specific vaccine or medicine (e.g., antiviral drug) has been proven to be effective against Ebola.

Symptoms of Ebola are treated as they appear. The following basic interventions, when used early, can significantly improve the chances of survival:

  • Providing intravenous fluids (IV) and balancing electrolytes (body salts)
  • Maintaining oxygen status and blood pressure
  • Treating other infections if they occur

Some experimental treatments developed for Ebola have been tested and proven effective in animals but have not yet been tested in randomized trials in humans.

 

 

 

For the latest Ebola news, please visit any of the following websites:

Federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

California Department of Public Health

Los Angeles County Department of Public Health

 

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